Abraham Lincoln’s wisdom shows up our swamp-ridden politics


Abraham Lincoln’s wisdom shows up our swamp-ridden politics | Jonathan Freedland | Comment is free | The Guardian, 26 January 2013

Obama’s inauguration carries symbolic resonance on Martin Luther King Day


Obama’s inauguration carries symbolic resonance on Martin Luther King Day | World news | guardian.co.uk, 21 January 2013

Virginia’s attorney general says it’s okay to break the law for Jesus


 

English: Attorney General of Virginia Ken Cucc...

English: Attorney General of Virginia Ken Cuccinelli (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Daily Kos: Virginia’s attorney general says it’s okay to break the law for Jesus.  Reblogged from 15 January 2013 edition

Like me, you may need to read this more than once…just to be sure you read it correctly first time around…

[Virginia Attorney General, Ken]  Cuccinelli recounted an exchange with his own bishop in which he counseled the cleric to embrace civil disobedience: “My local bishop said, ‘Well, you know I told a group I’m ready to go to jail.’ And I said, ‘Bishop, don’t take this personally: You need to go to jail.’”

Lest you think Cuccinelli and his bishop were casually discussing breaking the law in a righteous battle for some greater good, you can stop that right now. Because the greater good for which these two fine Catholics think law-breaking is worthwhile is, of course, the fight to stop women from having access to basic health care because Abraham Lincoln had some good quotes about stuff and also religious liberty:

“You know, Abraham Lincoln has many good quotes, but one of them is ‘the best way to get rid of a bad law is to enforce it vigorously.’ And here we’re going to have an example of what tyranny means when it’s played to its logical conclusion,” Cuccinelli said. “Because forcing business owners and businesses to do this is not consistent with our history of preserving religious liberty, one of the most important protections we have in this country.”

If you’re scratching your head trying to figure out how encouraging civil disobedience is actually a form of “vigorously” enforcing the law, don’t bother. It doesn’t make sense, and it isn’t supposed to. We’re talking about Republicans, after all, and they never let a little thing, like not making a goddamned bit of sense, stop them.

For almost a year, wingnuts and Catholic bishops (and yes, in the Venn diagram, that’s basically just one big circle) have been whining and stamping their feet and reciting their favorite old timey quotes because it makes them super sad to think about women having basic health care. This has not actually persuaded anyone that women having health care is a bad thing. Quite the opposite, as demonstrated by about a bazillion polls on the issue. Not like that ever stops them.

The Trouble With Steven Spielberg’s ‘Lincoln’


The Trouble With Steven Spielberg’s ‘Lincoln’ | The Nation, 27 November 2012

An Inconvenient Truth About Lincoln (That You Won’t Hear from Hollywood)


Lynn Parramore: An Inconvenient Truth About Lincoln (That You Won’t Hear from Hollywood).  Reblogged from Huffington Post, 22 November 2012

Famous Old Photos Recreated in Color by Sanna Dullaway


sanna dullaway reimagines abraham lincoln (image: courtesy demilked)

Famous Old Photos Recreated in Color by Sanna Dullaway | DeMilked.  Reblogged 22 November 2012

So there’s a debate raging about the ethics of this work; whether the issue is artistic or historical isn’t clear from the preamble.  For myself, I’m agnostic about this.  As some of the images are fairly recent, lack of colour seems merely an accident.  The older ones may be a bit more problematic, although techniques were available to give some tints to the work.

But then I grew up before colour television was widely available.  When it did hit the market, the quality left much to be desired.  It’s long been a theory of mine that the wide spread dissemination of colour television technology, coupled with faster international communication, helped bring an end to many Cold War tensions.  In the 50s and 60s, images from Eastern Europe were uniformly grey and dull.  Suddenly we were receiving news reports from cities with brightly coloured buildings, many in pastels.  Pastels!  How can you hate people who paint their homes so brightly?  Especially if they’re not next door…